Your Guide to Pub Culture in the UK

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Pubs are an important part of the culture in the UK. They are often central to their communities and a place where people can relax, socialize, and even work. Join us as we take a deeper dive into what you can expect from UK pub culture.

History of Pubs in the UK

Exploring UK Pubs

A great way to meet people once you have moved to the UK is to join clubs. From book clubs, to singing groups and walking associations, there is a club for every interest. If you’re living in a city it shouldn’t be too hard to find a whole spectrum of groups, there are some very niche ones too.

Simply turn up and start making friends. Even the smallest villages in the UK will usually have some sort of social club or book group to join and that something you can become part of while working in hospitality in the UK.

So many of our UK Pub Co. family members became part not only of the “pub crew” but became friends with locals and their friends & family. If you also would like to go and explore the UK and learn the pub culture, contact us to book a chat or apply now!

Pubs have been around in the UK in some form or other for hundreds of years. In terms of how we get to modern-day culture, it all started with a vast expansion of alehouses in the 16th century, with an estimated one drinking establishment for every 200 people!
 
Things changed again in the 19th century with the Beerhouse Act, which was signed into law in 1830. This gave more freedom to purpose-built pubs which would have unique architecture which stood out from the homes surrounding them. Many of the pubs from this time are still in use today.
 

That’s part of the reason why pubs in the UK are interesting, as there is often an incredible amount of history around them. For generation after generation, Brits have seen the pub as the place to be.

A Social Hub

The reason why pubs are so popular is that they are a social hub where everyone can go to drink and socialize. It was often the way that workers would go there after a long day in the factories to relax and get the stress of the day out of their system.

While the job market may have drastically changed in the last 100 years, many still see the pub as a warm and inviting place to meet old friends and have a great time. That includes a wide range of entertainment.

Many pubs have their own sports teams, or a pub would be the central hub for surrounding playing fields. Whether it’s football, darts, pool, or cricket, pubs are still closely connected with sports in the UK.
 

But even without sports, pubs still thrive. While trouble can happen from time to time, most people find pubs to be extremely friendly environments where strangers freely talk to each other. Even in these modern times with plenty of distractions at home, pubs continue to play a vital role in their communities.

History of UK Pub Names

Interested in the history of pubs in the UK? There’s no better place to start than their names. The most common pub name in the UK is the Red Lion, which goes back to King James ordering a red lion to be displayed on buildings of importance.
 
Other common names include:
 
The Crown – Used for pubs that supported the monarchy but didn’t want to attach their name in case they didn’t last very long!
 
The Royal Oak – A symbol of defiance when Prince Charles hid in a great oak tree after the Battle of Worcester in 1651.
 
White Hart – As a white hart (a hart was an old name for a stag) was a symbol on the badge of King Richard II.
 
While it can be interesting hearing about these common names, there are also a lot of funny pub names out there which tell their own story. Many of these come from local folklore. Some examples are:
 
The Bucket of Blood – This is apparently because the landlord went to get water from the well and came up with a bucket of blood! In reality, it was probably just water dyed red from the local tin mine!
 
The Moon Under the Water – This delightful name is courtesy of famous writer George Orwell. It was the title of an essay he wrote about his vision of the perfect pub.
 
The Dirty Habit – This seems like an offensive name, but it actually has a religious background. Pubs with this name are all close to a church, and monks would often walk by with their worn clothing, which was called a habit!
 

Whatever pub you visit in the UK, it’s a great idea to check out its name and see the history behind it. Often there is a fascinating story, especially if it’s one of the many older pubs. Many pubs also adorn their walls with old pictures of the local area or capture notable events in their history.

Exploring UK Pubs

A great way to meet people once you have moved to the UK is to join clubs. From book clubs, to singing groups and walking associations, there is a club for every interest. If you’re living in a city it shouldn’t be too hard to find a whole spectrum of groups, there are some very niche ones too.

Simply turn up and start making friends. Even the smallest villages in the UK will usually have some sort of social club or book group to join and that something you can become part of while working in hospitality in the UK.

So many of our UK Pub Co. family members became part not only of the “pub crew” but became friends with locals and their friends & family. If you also would like to go and explore the UK and learn the pub culture, contact us to book a chat or apply now!

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